For Students Who Took the BC Version of the AP Calculus Exam
For Students Who Took the AB Version of the AP Calculus Exam


For Students Who Took the BC Version of the AP Calculus Exam

There's only one small topic that SCU covers in a previous class that you may not have seen. That topic is Hyperbolic Functions, which is covered in Math 12. To get yourself up to speed on this topic, you can do either one or both of the following: Either way you go, you should do some of the basic odd numbered homework problems in your book to check that you have the essential ideas down. If you need help selecting these, just ask your current calculus instructor. For additional resources on this and other Math 12 topics, please see our on-line help page.


For Students Who Took the AB Version of the AP Calculus Exam

Although many high school AP calculus classes cover some or all of the following five topics, they are not mandated for the AB exam: hyperbolic functions, l'Hôpital's rule, improper integration, integration by parts, and partial fractions. Here are our suggestions for learning any of these five topics if you previously missed them:
  1. For hyperbolic functions: you can get yourself up to speed on this small topic by doing either one or both of the following:

  2. For l'Hôpital's rule and improper integration, you can likely pick up most of what you need to know from the book. L'Hôpital's rule is Section 3.8 on pages 216-222. Improper integration is Section 7.8 on pages 491-501. If you have any questions, see your instructor.

  3. For integration by parts and partial fractions, you'll need to do a bit more work. These are two techniques for integrating functions. Integration by parts arises a lot in probability courses like MATH 122 and AMTH 108 and also in differential equations courses like MATH 22, MATH 144 and AMTH 106. Partial fractions is the crucial tool for using Laplace transforms in MATH 22 and AMTH 106. In other words, you need to know these two techniques. You should do either one or both of the following to get up to speed on these:
No matter what you do, you should work through some of the basic odd numbered homework problems in your book to check that you have the essential ideas down. If you need help selecting these, just ask your current calculus instructor, or, if you attended a class, do the homework that instructor assigned. For additional resources on this and other Math 12 topics, please see our on-line help page.